Join AASLH’s Middle Tennessee StEPs group for a one-day workshop focusing on evaluating and improving the interpretation at your museum or historic site. Max van Balgooy, president of Engaging Places, LLC, a design and strategy firm that helps connect people with historic places, will present effective strategies for interpreting history and the humanities at museums and historic sites.

Register by August 10 to guarantee a spot.

oaklands-museum-page

Workshop Goals

  1. Describe effective strategies for interpreting history and the humanities at museums and historic sites.
  2. Use StEPs as a model for standards and best practices for museums and historic sites.
  3. Help organizations evaluate current interpretation in order to prioritize activities and begin incorporating new interpretive approaches.

 

Tentative Agenda

8:00     Registration

8:30     Welcome and introductions

9:00     Presentation: Mission, Vision, Outcomes, Content

10:00   Exercise: What do you want people to know, feel, or do as a result of visiting? Why is that important?

11:00   Presentation: Audiences, Needs, and Motivations

12 n     Lunch (provided)

1:00     Exercise: Who are your current and potential audiences? What are their characteristics and needs?

2:00     Presentation: Method and Planning.

3:00     Break

3:15     Exercise: Next steps, priorities for the next six months?

4:00     Evaluation

4:15     Thanks and closing

4:30     Adjourn

 

Faculty

Max A. van Balgooy is the president of Engaging Places, LLC, a design and strategy firm that helps connect people with historic places. He is a national leader in historical interpretation and community engagement, with extensive experience in developing solutions in collaboration with diverse audiences, including volunteers, staff, trustees, residents, scholars, design professionals, business leaders, and elected officials. He has more than 35 years of experience working in museums historic preservation, heritage tourism, and historic sites, including senior positions at the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Workman and Temple Homestead Museum. A recognized researcher, author, speaker, and blogger on the trends, challenges, and opportunities facing museums, historic sites, and cultural organizations, he is a frequently requested facilitator, trainer, and consultant on business strategy, historical interpretation, public programming, marketing, and online media. He also served on the Council of the American Association for State and Local History, is a MAP Peer Reviewer with the American Alliance of Museums, and teaches in the Museum Studies Program at George Washington University. He received his M.A. in history from the University of Delaware as a Hagley Fellow, his B.A. in history from Pomona College, and participated in the Historic Deerfield Summer Program in Early American History and Material Culture and the Attingham Summer School for the Study of Historic Houses and Collections.