BROWSE RESOURCES ABOUT ‘Audience’

  • Start off the Annual Meeting with a session guaranteed to challenge and inspire. Sharing examples from their own institution, staff from the Arab American National Museum will facilitate a discussion on how becoming more culturally competent can enable institutions to respond to changing demographics and work with new audiences. Chair: Kate Betz, Bullock State History […]

  • In this session, participants will gain ideas for enhancing accessibility for all visitors in ways that go beyond the legal obligations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Panelists include professionals who are actively promoting accessibility through innovative programs and partnerships at history museums of varying size, scope, and location. Chair: Caroline Braden, Guest Accessibility/Special […]

  • Detroit’s story reflects our own. Collectively and individually, we are constantly evolving, embracing new opportunities, and reacting to forces beyond our control. Navigating these contemporary challenges, while facing an unpredictable future, requires periodically re-thinking our direction.  In doing so, we rely on the past for context, examples, and inspiration. The role of a public historian […]

  • Are you wondering how to integrate STEM learning at your historic site? Create.Connect, an indoor, year-round exhibition for families at Conner Prairie, was created in 2014 to weave together history and STEM through the use of hands-on activities, historical settings and live facilitation. It’s a testing ground for new ways to integrate history and STEM […]

  • Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Connecticut runs a video blog with great informational videos on their programs, projects, and interpretation philosophy. Learn how they work with volunteers, reach out to young audiences through experiential learning, and bring historic trades to life for modern visitors. Check out the other videos […]

  • This leaflet by Dina Bailey, Chris Taylor, and Elizabeth Pickard discusses the possibilities and pitfalls of creating inclusive programming for young adults. Working with young adults can be a successful way to cultivate a new, more diverse generation of museum professionals. And the addition of inclusion in these programs is essential to the organization’s success […]

  • Allowing your users to contribute content to your website requires radical trust. This concept, gaining steam with the popularity of social media tools, naturally raises concern in history organizations. It threatens authoritative voice and weakens control. Yet, it offers opportunities to reach and engage new audiences.Join us as we discuss the challenges of radical trust. […]

  • This leaflet by Ohio History Connection Local History Services Manager Mark Sundlov discusses opportunities  and methods of demonstrating your organization’s or project’s relevance to various audiences. It includes sections on connecting with educators, neighbors, donors, and community leaders. It also features a statement from Tim Grove on the History Relevance Campaign. Technical Leaflet #273 (Winter […]

  • Download webinar here What, exactly, did newspapers across the U.S. have to say about the Holocaust during World War II? Your collections may hold the answer! What Did We Know? Citizen History, Local Newspapers, and the Holocaust A digital project from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, is turning to “citizen historians” to research how […]

  • Table of Contents: On Doing Local History: The Crime of Writing by Carol Kammen Generation Why: History Repeats Itself (Even When It Comes to Engaging Millenials) by Colleen Dilenschneider The Power of Possibility by Kent Whitworth and Scott Alvey Above and Below: Exhibition as Mitigation by Louise Pubols Leading Historical Programs: Strategies for Innovation by […]