BROWSE RESOURCES ABOUT ‘Tribal Museums And Cultural Centers’

  • As the Chief of Museum Learning at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Tim Grove has quite a few stories to tell about his experiences in public history. In this excerpt from his book A Grizzly in the Mail and Other Adventures in American History, Grove describes an exhibit project about the Lewis and Clark expedition […]

  • Difficult histories include the recollections of trauma, oppression, and violence. The challenge for museum workers to develop ethical representations of difficult histories is finding an equitable equation for combining the three conceptual components: Faces, Real content, and Narratives. When combined, these three components are the building blocks for developing ethical representations of difficult histories. A […]

  • C-SPAN recording of Chip Colwell-Chathaphonh speaking about his book Massacre at Camp Grant: Forgetting and Remembering Apache History (University of Arizona Press; May 17, 2007). In his book he discusses a forgotten massacre on April 30, 1871, of more than a hundred Apache men, women, and children who had surrendered to the U.S. Army at […]

  • The Heritage Emergency National Task Force, sponsored by Heritage Preservation and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, provides resources for emergency preparedness focused on the needs of heritage organizations. The Task Force’s website provides numerous free downloads and links to other helpful websites for risk management, planning for emergencies, preparing historic properties, funding, training staff and […]

  • Since 1936, the Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada has come to be regarded as a standard resource for those working in state and local history. This 15th edition updates, expands, and adds entries to provide information on almost 13,000 history-related organizations and programs in the United States and Canada. Useful […]

  • Across North America, hundreds of reconstructed living history sites, which traditionally presented history from a primarily European perspective, have hired Native American staff in an attempt to communicate a broader view of the past. Playing Ourselves explores this major shift in representation, using detailed observations of five historic sites in the U.S. and Canada to […]

  • As part of the “Discover” series, Ann Marshall highlights the Heard Museum’s Home exhibit . Home: Native People in the Southwest tells the story of habitation in the region through the museum’s extensive collection of Native art and domestic artifacts. Marshall explains the exhibition concept and installation process the Heard Museum undertook. This exhibit was […]

  • The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian opened in September of 2004 on the Washington Mall. Douglas E. Evelyn provides an overview of the creation of the museum leading up to the opening. He particularly emphasizes the involvement of Native peoples in the planning process and how this affected the atmosphere and visitor experience of […]

  • The Nohwike’ Bagowa Museum and the Fort Apache Historic Park won an AASLH Award of Merit in 2005 for the interpretative concept Transitions in the Apache World: The Fort Apache Legacy. Transitions is composed of two exhibitions and permanent signage for an interpretative trail throughout the Fort Apache National Register Historic District. The two exhibitions, […]

  • Upon the discovery of a native, basketry-style fish trap on the banks of Montana Creek, archaeologists stabilized and preserved this unique trap – the first of its kind excavated on the Northwest Coast. After sitting in storage, the Juneau-Douglas City Museum received a grand-in-aid from the Alaska State Museum to stabilize and build a custom […]